Use of LARCs in the U.S. after vs. before the 2016 presidential election

There was a significant increase in insertions of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) among commercially insured women during the 30 business days after the 2016 presidential election, according to new research.

There was a significant increase in insertions of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) among commercially insured women during the 30 business days after the 2016 presidential election, according to new research. The researchers looked at commercially insured women during the 30 days before and after November 8 in 2015 and 2016, using billing codes to calculate daily LARC insertion rates. The mean adjusted daily LARC insertion rate in 2015 was 12.9 per 100,000 women in the 30 business days before and inclusive of November 8, compared with 13.7 per 100,000 women in the 30 days after. The mean adjusted daily LARC insertion rates for the 30-day periods before and after the 2016 election were 13.4 per 100,000 and 16.3 per 100,000 women, a 21.6% increase. The researchers note that if their results were projected to the 33 million women insured women aged 18–45 years, the rate would rise from an approximately 4,716 expected insertions per day to about 5,416, or 700 more per day in association with the 2016 election. "Our findings could reflect a response to fears of losing contraceptive coverage because of President Trump's opposition to the [Affordable Care Act] or an association of the 2016 election with reproductive intentions or LARC awareness," the researchers suggest. "Our findings also suggest that women with commercial health insurance value contraceptive coverage and that concerns about potential reductions in access or coverage may affect their contraceptive choices."