Study shows high price tag for measles outbreak response

A report published in JAMA Pediatrics found that a single measles case in 2013 in New York City led to an outbreak that affected 58 people. An unvaccinated adolescent from Brooklyn's orthodox Jewish community who returned to New York City became infectious after visiting London.

A report published in JAMA Pediatrics found that a single measles case in 2013 in New York City led to an outbreak that affected 58 people. An unvaccinated adolescent from Brooklyn's orthodox Jewish community who returned to New York City became infectious after visiting London. Of the 58 cases, 78% were at least 12 months of age and were not vaccinated due to parental denial or deliberate delay. Twelve patients were younger than age 1 year and were too young to be immunized with the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. When researchers estimated the staff costs of responding to the outbreak, they found that 87 workers from 12 offices of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene participated. Public health workers spent more than 10,000 hours responding to the outbreak, primarily on investigations and lab work. Most of the $394,448 direct cost of the outbreak was staff time, while other costs included advertising, MMR vaccine, lab supplies/testing, and courier services.