Study finds no benefit for omega-3 supplements on cognitive decline

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health report that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older adults. The clinical trial followed about 4,200 individuals over a 5-year period. The participants were all at risk for developing late age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and their average age was 72 years.

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health report that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older adults. The clinical trial followed about 4,200 individuals over a 5-year period. The participants were all at risk for developing late age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and their average age was 72 years. Participants received long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) and/or lutein/zeaxanthin or placebo. All participants also received various combinations of vitamins C, E, beta carotene, and zinc. However, according to the data, there were no statistically significant differences in change of cognitive function scores. The researchers also report that randomization to high or low levels doses of zinc or beta carotene vs. no beta carotene had no statistically significant effect.