Single-dose zoliflodacin for treatment of urogenital gonorrhea

As the incidence of gonorrhea continues to rise and Neisseria gonorrhoeae develops resistance to more antibiotics, a new Phase II trial reveals that zoliflodacin—an investigational spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial agent—successfully treated most uncomplicated urogenital and rectal gonococcal infections.

As the incidence of gonorrhea continues to rise and Neisseria gonorrhoeae develops resistance to more antibiotics, a new Phase II trial reveals that zoliflodacin—an investigational spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial agent—successfully treated most uncomplicated urogenital and rectal gonococcal infections. The multicenter study, funded in part by NIH, compared the safety and efficacy of a single dose of 2 g or 3 g of oral zoliflodacin with 500 mg of intramuscular ceftriaxone for the treatment of uncomplicated urogenital gonorrhea. Among the 141 participants in the microbiologic intention-to-treat population with available data, microbiologic cure at urogenital sites was documented in 96% of those who received either 2 g or 3 g of zoliflodacin and 100% of those who received ceftriaxone. All rectal infections were cured in the 5 participants who received 2 g of zoliflodacin, the 7 who received 3 g of zoliflodacin, and the 3 who received ceftriaxone. For pharyngeal infections, 50%, 82%, and 100% of the participants in the three groups, respectively, were cured. The most frequent adverse events associated with zoliflodacin were gastrointestinal, the researchers report.