Paternal use of antidepressants and offspring outcomes in Sweden

A prospective study out of Sweden explored whether preterm birth, malformations, autism, and intellectual disability could be linked to the father's use of antidepressants around the time when the baby was conceived. The dataset included about 170,500 children nationwide conceived from July 29, 2005, born in 2006–07, followed up to 2014.

A prospective study out of Sweden explored whether preterm birth, malformations, autism, and intellectual disability could be linked to the father's use of antidepressants around the time when the baby was conceived. The dataset included about 170,500 children nationwide conceived from July 29, 2005, born in 2006–07, followed up to 2014. Among them were 3,983 children born to men who were on antidepressive medications 4 weeks before conception to 4 weeks after, 2,033 whose fathers did not use the drugs during the conception period but did later in the pregnancy period, and 164,492 children with no parental antidepressant exposure at all. The analysis showed that children whose fathers used antidepressants at conception were no more likely than children whose fathers did not use them to be born early, be malformed, or develop autism. Moreover, they were actually at a lower risk of intellectual disability than kids with no paternal exposure to antidepressants.