Naloxone still stable months after expiration date, research says

Naloxone has become more widely available as the opioid addiction crisis continues to sweep the nation. New research found that the naloxone nasal spray, Narcan, was found to be chemically stable for 10 months after its labeled expiration date.

Naloxone has become more widely available as the opioid addiction crisis continues to sweep the nation. New research found that the naloxone nasal spray, Narcan, was found to be chemically stable for 10 months after its labeled expiration date. Additionally, a naloxone injection, Evzio, was chemically stable for at least 1 year after its expiration date. Researchers said the products were not kept in ideal storage conditions. "Every one of them tested the same, which is what was impressive, especially considering the fact that we had actually dispensed these products to patients," said Charles Babcock, assistant clinical professor in the School of Pharmacy at Marshall University and principal investigator of the research. "I dispense naloxone to patients all the time, and I had a couple come in after it had expired, and they had used it, and people were brought back to life." Babcock presented the research this week at the PharmSci 360 Annual Meeting. Although expired medication may still work in some cases, patients are advised not to take it. "We go by the expiration date, and we don't recommend people to take medications beyond their expiration date because, quite frankly, we don't know if it has decomposed or not," warned Chris McCurdy, 2018 president of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.