Millions of kids on ADHD meds decide their treatment as adults

Many U.S. children diagnosed with ADHD are debating whether to continue taking their medication as they enter into adulthood. Research shows that medication reduces the symptoms of ADD and ADHD approximately 80% of the time.

Many U.S. children diagnosed with ADHD are debating whether to continue taking their medication as they enter into adulthood. Research shows that medication reduces the symptoms of ADD and ADHD approximately 80% of the time. Despite its effectiveness, as children age, they typically want to use the medication less and deal with their symptoms in other ways. Many only use the medication when needed and regulate their medication by what tasks require more concentration, such as school or work. Experts recommend getting a doctor's input before practicing self-regulation of medication. Russell A. Barkley, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Virginia Treatment Center for Children and the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond, stresses the potential hazards associated with self-regulation of ADD/ADHD medications without the supervision of a health care professional. "There can be poor understanding of the side effects profile of the meds, poor dosing, failure to understand any contraindications and dependency from excess usage," Barkley says.