Insulin at risk from variable temperatures of home refrigerators

An observational study led by Katarina Braune, MD, from Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Germany, found that household refrigerators failed to keep insulin within the manufacturer-recommended temperature range in many instances.

An observational study led by Katarina Braune, MD, from Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Germany, found that household refrigerators failed to keep insulin within the manufacturer-recommended temperature range in many instances. Braune said, "Nearly every dataset relating to fridge storage showed excursions from the recommended range that is below 2 degrees C and above 8 degrees C, and even some excursions below 0 degrees C." The study monitored 338 E.U. and U.S. patients for an average of 49 days between November 2016 and February 2018. The participants placed 400 temperature loggers/sensors manufactured by MedAngel ONE next to their insulin, either in the refrigerator or in their "diabetes bag." Readings were taken every 3 minutes, and the information was sent to an app and stored in a secure online database. For domestic refrigerators, the recorded temperature by an average sensor was out of the recommended range of 2–8 degrees C for 11.31% of the time, which was equivalent to 2 hours, 43 minutes a day. Bernhard Gehr, MD, senior diabetologist at Fachklinik Bad Heilbrunn, Germany, said in comments about the study that "what we need next is real world data that address how the observed conditions might impair insulin quality." MedAngel ONE is now commercializing a thermometer that links to a smartphone app via Bluetooth.