Gilead will donate drug to U.S. for HIV prevention

Gilead Sciences will donate emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Truvada), the only drug approved to prevent infection with HIV, to the United States in order to supply 200,000 patients annually for up to 11 years.

Gilead Sciences will donate emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Truvada), the only drug approved to prevent infection with HIV, to the United States in order to supply 200,000 patients annually for up to 11 years. HHS officials said the donation came about "as a result of discussions between the Trump administration and Gilead." The drug is taken once daily to prevent infection with HIV, a strategy called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). An estimated 1 million Americans are at risk for infection and should be taking the drug, but only about 270,000 are doing so. The high cost of the drug has been called a major barrier to stemming the spread of HIV among low-income Americans, critics say, and part of the reason the AIDS epidemic has persisted for so long. A less expensive generic version of the drug is expected next year. Gilead will donate Truvada until Descovy is approved for HIV prevention and then switch patients to the new drug.