Find your voice in the NPN

From the NPAC By Cortney M. Mospan, PharmD, BCACP, BCGP

The end of my term as New Practitioner Advisory Committee (NPAC) chair in March was a bittersweet time. Approaching my fifth graduation anniversary, the New Practitioner Network (NPN) has truly become a “home,” where I’ve created lasting friendships and had valuable leadership experiences along the way. While I am sad to leave a leadership opportunity that has not only facilitated my own professional development but has allowed me to create development opportunities for my peers, I am also excited to welcome in the new NPAC and see a new generation of leadership ushered in. I cannot wait to cheer them on from the sidelines as they find their voice, passion, and serve their colleagues.

What I realized in my 2 years on NPAC is that New Practitioner voices matter to the Association, both among the staff and the senior volunteer leaders. Don’t hesitate to throw your hat in the ring to be considered for committee service, a slated position for election, or just making your voice heard at Association events. It is truly an exciting time to be a New Practitioner! Commit to one area where you think you have valuable insight, experience, or passion to contribute to the work of the Association. I promise you won’t regret it.

The NPAC exists to direct educational programs and other resources for New Practitioners within APhA. They are here to represent YOU, so please feel free to reach out to the 2018–19 NPAC leaders if you have suggestions for educational programming or resources recent graduates need, want to learn how to get more involved in the NPN, or if you simply want to know your leadership better. Contact information can be found at http://www.pharmacist.com/apha-new-practitioner-advisory-committee.

NPN opportunities
My time within the NPN has been an essential part of my professional development, not only in my development of organizational management and leadership skills, but also my understanding of the profession and building my own professional network. I would not be the pharmacist I am today without NPN and I want to encourage you to consider opportunities to get involved.

There are several different ways to get engaged with NPN, with varying levels of time commitment. There’s the three standing committees (Communications, Member Engagement, and Education), the Transitions Editorial Advisory Board, and the APhA New Practitioner Mentor ProgramAPhA–ASP Chapters are always looking for mentors and many have multiple mentors to provide various practice perspectives. More information about the various leadership opportunities is available at http://www.pharmacist.com/new-practitioner-network.

In the past year, NPN launched the Community Health Ambassador program, which provides ready-to-use presentation materials for education about prescription drug abuse and dietary supplements. NPAC leadership has championed this project and we would love to see more New Practitioners get involved in their communities. I have given a handful of the dietary supplement education presentations to seniors in my community. They always come engaged and ask many questions.

Also, make sure you are connecting with your primary academy, the Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science (APhA–APRS), or the Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APhAAPPM). NPAC has been partnering with APhA–APPM New Practitioner Officer and the APhA–APRS Postgraduate Officer over the past year to enhance collaboration and communication among NPN and the APhA Academies.

Thank you, fellow New Practitioners, for the opportunity to serve you, and I hope to see many new faces take their own leap of faith in their leadership journey!

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