Efficacy and safety of guselkumab in patients with active psoriatic arthritis

Researchers investigated whether the psoriasis treatment guselkumab might also have a positive effect on psoriatic arthritis, a common comorbidity of the skin disorder. The multinational trial involved 149 adult patients with plaque psoriasis covering at least 3% of their body and active psoriatic arthritis affecting multiple joints.

Researchers investigated whether the psoriasis treatment guselkumab might also have a positive effect on psoriatic arthritis, a common comorbidity of the skin disorder. The multinational trial involved 149 adult patients with plaque psoriasis covering at least 3% of their body and active psoriatic arthritis affecting multiple joints. To qualify, patients had to have demonstrated intolerance or lack of response to standard therapies. A total of 100 enrollees were randomly allocated to treatment with subcutaneous guselkumab, with the remaining 49 assigned to placebo. At 24 weeks, 58% of the patients in the intervention group achieved the primary outcome—a 20% or greater improvement in signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis—versus 18% of the patients receiving placebo. Roughly a third of participants in each cohort, meanwhile, suffered at least one adverse event—most often, infection. The Phase IIa study continued through week 44, with 29 of the 49 patients in the placebo group crossing over to guselkumab. The rate of adverse events from the start of the study to the finish in patients treated with guselkumab showed no disproportional increase with prolonged exposure to the novel anti-interleukin 23p19 antibody. The researchers believe their findings support further development of guselkumab as a novel treatment for psoriatic arthritis.