Effect of lanreotide on kidney function in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

A randomized clinical trial in the Netherlands questioned whether lanreotide could slow the deterioration of renal function in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

A randomized clinical trial in the Netherlands questioned whether lanreotide could slow the deterioration of renal function in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). There are limited treatment options for the condition, which often requires kidney replacement therapy; but lanreotide belongs to a class of drug—somatostatin analogues—that has demonstrated renoprotective properties in models for polycystic kidney disease. With this in mind, the researchers recruited more than 300 adult patients with later-stage ADPKD to participate in their study, and 261 completed the protocol. Participants received either usual care plus subcutaneous lanreotide once every 4 weeks or usual care alone for a period of 2.5 years. The primary outcome was annual change in estimated glomerular filtration rate, a marker of disease progression, which was not meaningfully different with lanreotide than with standard care. Based on the study results, the researchers do not support the use of lanreotide to preserve kidney function in later-stage ADPKD.