CDC data confirm: Progress in HIV prevention has stalled

After about 5 years of large declines, the number of HIV infections in the United States started to plateau in 2013, at about 39,000 infections a year, CDC reported Wednesday. The agency's analysis looked at HIV trends in the United States from 2010 to 2016.

After about 5 years of large declines, the number of HIV infections in the United States started to plateau in 2013, at about 39,000 infections a year, CDC reported Wednesday. The agency's analysis looked at HIV trends in the United States from 2010 to 2016. Additionally, the report found that annual HIV infections declined among some subgroups, while they increased among others. According to CDC, the decline in HIV infections has leveled off as HIV prevention and treatment are not adequately reaching the individuals who could benefit from them most. "These gaps remain particularly troublesome in rural areas and in the South and among disproportionately affected populations like African-Americans and Latinos," CDC said. Eugene McCray, MD, director of CDC's Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, noted: "After a decades-long struggle, the path to eliminate America's HIV epidemic is clear. Expanding efforts across the country will close gaps, overcome threats, and turn around troublesome trends."