Association of medication nonadherence among adult survivors of stroke after ACA implementation

A study out of the University of Michigan Medical School compared cost-related nonadherence (CRN), or the inability to afford prescription drugs, before and after implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). For their sample, researchers chose adult survivors of stroke, who face steep out-of-pocket costs.

A study out of the University of Michigan Medical School compared cost-related nonadherence (CRN), or the inability to afford prescription drugs, before and after implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). For their sample, researchers chose adult survivors of stroke, who face steep out-of-pocket costs. National Health Interview Survey data on nearly 14,000 stroke survivors aged 45–64 years provided the basis for analysis, which found that CRN declined in this patient population after the ACA was put in place. According to the findings, CRN in the target population increased over time before the law took effect, to as high as 23.8% during 2011–13. Following ACA implementation, however, CRN in adult stroke survivors fell by 5.7% as health insurance coverage increased and underinsurance declined. The study results indicate that expansion of Medicaid coverage in more states could have additional positive impact on medication affordability and adherence for adults who have survived a stroke.