Alzheimer drug trial shows cognitive decline sharply slowed

A clinical trial of an experimental Alzheimer drug found that aducanumab sharply slowed cognitive decline and reduced plaque. The study involved 166 patients who were randomly assigned to receive one of several doses of aducanumab or a placebo. Researchers found that higher doses of the drug were more effective than lower doses.

A clinical trial of an experimental Alzheimer drug found that aducanumab sharply slowed cognitive decline and reduced plaque. The study involved 166 patients who were randomly assigned to receive one of several doses of aducanumab or a placebo. Researchers found that higher doses of the drug were more effective than lower doses. Experts say the findings—presented at the International Conference on Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases and Related Neurological Disorders—are promising, though they note that the small Phase I trial was designed to assess safety, not the drug's effect on cognition. Also, a major adverse effect of the drug was localized swelling in the brain known as ARIA-E. The results indicated that of the patients with a genetic variant that increases the risk of getting Alzheimer, 55% of those who received the highest dose of aducanumab experienced this condition, compared with 17% of high-dose patients without the genetic variant.