41% of adults don't plan to get influenza vaccine despite last year's deadly season

As of mid-November, more than 40% of U.S. adults said they had not been vaccinated against influenza, nor did they plan to do so, according to a new survey from NORC at the University of Chicago. Many of those individuals expressed concern about adverse effects from the influenza vaccine or about contracting influenza from the vaccination.

As of mid-November, more than 40% of U.S. adults said they had not been vaccinated against influenza, nor did they plan to do so, according to a new survey from NORC at the University of Chicago. Many of those individuals expressed concern about adverse effects from the influenza vaccine or about contracting influenza from the vaccination. Others reasons for not getting vaccinated included that influenza vaccines were not very effective and that the individual did not expect to get sick from influenza. Health officials note that any adverse effects associated with the influenza vaccine are generally mild and the vaccine does not cause influenza. They also point to the high toll influenza took last year, with about 80,000 deaths in the United States. The survey noted that among adults with children younger than age 18 years, 39% said they do not vaccinate their children. In all, 43% of adults said they had been vaccinated against influenza and 14% more said they had not yet been vaccinated but plan to this season. The highest rate of influenza vaccination was among individuals older than age 60 years, while the lowest rates were among adults younger than age 45 years. The survey included about 1,200 interviews with a nationally representative sample of people in all 50 states and Washington, DC.