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1. It is important to know that individuals learn differently and for different reasons.

 

To give a very quick overview of some distinctions:

 

Learning Styles
Individuals have different learning styles, meaning that it is easier for different people to learn things in different ways.  There are various approaches to categorizing learning styles, which group common ways that people learn.  Read through the descriptions below to see which learning style(s) you identify with.  (Keep in mind that individuals generally can learn through more than one style, but one or two styles often predominate as the preferred style.)

 

The Visual/ Verbal Learning Style
You prefer to have information is presented visually and in writing. For example, if you were learning to use a new device, it would be most helpful for you to read the instructions. In a classroom, it is helpful for you when instructors use the blackboard (or other written format, such as a handout or slides with text) to highlight key points of the lecture.  You tend to like to study by yourself in a quiet room and to obtain information from text in written materials. When trying to remember something, you may see the information in your mind.
 

The Visual/ Nonverbal Learning Style
You prefer when information is presented visually and in graphically. For you, a pictures is truly worth a thousand words. For example, if you were learning to use a new device, it would be most helpful for you to see pictures or other visual aids that show you how to use the device.  In a classroom, it is helpful for you when instructors use graphics such as images, video, maps and charts. You benefit from information obtained from the figures and other visual aids in written materials. You tend to like to work in a quiet room and may not like to work in study groups. When trying to remember something, you can often visualize a picture of it in your mind. You may enjoy artistic activities, such as visual arts or design, and may prefer to use visual images when you take notes.
 

The Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learning Style
You prefer to be physically engaged in an activity. For example, if you were learning to use a new device, it would be most helpful for you to use a hands-on approach with an actual device.  In the classroom, you prefer from a lab setting or other activities that allow you to learn by manipulating physical objects. You learn best when you are physically engaged with the learning environment. You also benefit from watching demonstrations and field work outside the classroom.
 

The Auditory/ Verbal Learning Style
You prefer to have information presented in an auditory format/orally. For example, if you were learning to use a new device, it would be most helpful for you to have someone else explain it to you.  In the classroom, you prefer to listen to lectures and participate in group discussions, and learn best from listening/speaking exchanges. You also benefit from obtaining information from audio recordings. When trying to remember something, you can often "hear" someone telling you the information, or the way you said it in the past. You may enjoy musical activities, and may associate certain sounds with pieces of information. 

 

Metamath.com. Learning Styles. Accessed June 2012 from http://ww2.metamath.com/lsweb/fourls.htm

 

2. To help you more efficiently plan your time, the content of APhA’s education activities are categorized into three levels of expertise:

 

Level 1: Baseline knowledge of the subject area is required. The information presented will be a primer on the topic and appropriate for a wide range of pharmacists. 
 

Level 2: Experience with the topic is recommended, but advanced expertise or specialty practice in the subject area is not necessary. These educational offerings will focus on expanding the learner’s knowledge and application of the new and/or more complex information. 
 

Level 3: Substantial knowledge and/or specialty experience with the subject area will be necessary to achieve a full understanding of the information presented. These educational offerings will focus on expanding current expertise.

3. Activity types are designed to give learners an idea of the intended outcome of a continuing pharmacy education (CPE) activity.

 

Knowledge-based activities are designed to enhance or add to pharmacists’ or technicians’ knowledge of a topic; mostly didactic sessions

 

Application-based activities provide pharmacists and technicians with opportunities to apply their knowledge, usually through case studies or other application activities.

 

Practice-based activities are a longer, more comprehensive activity of at least 15 hours that incorporate knowledge, skills, and performance. These activities are also known as certificate training programs.

 

 

Reflect on your educational needs  
 
Learn to improve your daily practice  
 
Evaluate your next goal  

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