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Progress has stalled in U.S. stroke death rates after decades of decline

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CDC reported Wednesday that after years of decline, progress has slowed in preventing deaths from stroke. According to the <i>Vital Signs</i> <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6635e1.htm?s_cid=mm6635e1_w" target="_blank">report</a>, the decline in stroke deaths slowed in 38 states and Washington, DC, from 2000 through 2015.

CDC reported Wednesday that after years of decline, progress has slowed in preventing deaths from stroke. According to the Vital Signs report, the decline in stroke deaths slowed in 38 states and Washington, DC, from 2000 through 2015. African Americans continue to have the highest stroke death rates among all races/ethnicities, the report found, while stroke death rates increased among Hispanics by 6% each year from 2013–15. Each year, nearly 800,000 people in the United States have a stroke, and more than 140,000 die, although about 80% of strokes are preventable. "These findings are a wakeup call. We've made enormous progress in reducing stroke deaths, but that progress has stalled," said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, MD. The single most preventable and treatable risk factor for stroke is high blood pressure, CDC said, noting that hospitals, doctors, rehabilitation specialists, emergency medical technicians, pharmacists, and other health professionals can help address stroke risk factors and improve patient outcomes if a stroke occurs. People should be educated about the importance of recognizing the signs and symptoms of a stroke early and calling 911 quickly, CDC said, and people should understand how to reduce their risk for stroke and how to prevent additional strokes if they have already had one.

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https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p0906-vs-stroke.html

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