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Evolocumab and clinical outcomes in patients with CVD

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The results of a new study show that, when added to statin therapy, evolocumab reduced LDL cholesterol levels by 59% from baseline levels compared with placebo. Adding evolocumab to statin therapy also significantly reduced the likelihood of cardiovascular events.

The results of a new study show that, when added to statin therapy, evolocumab reduced LDL cholesterol levels by 59% from baseline levels compared with placebo. Adding evolocumab to statin therapy also significantly reduced the likelihood of cardiovascular events. There was a 15% reduction in the risk of the primary composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or coronary revascularization; and a 20% decrease in the risk of the key secondary endpoint of cardiovascular, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study included more than 27,000 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and LDL cholesterol levels of 70 mg per deciliter or higher who were receiving statin therapy. Patients were randomized to receive evolocumab (140 mg every 2 weeks or 420 mg monthly) or matching placebo as subcutaneous injections. Over a median of 2.2 years of followup, injection site reactions were the only adverse events that were nominally significantly more common with evolocumab; however, those were rare, at a rate of 2.1% compared with 1.6% in the placebo group. The study results, note the researchers, "show that patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease benefit from the lowering of LDL cholesterol levels below current targets." The research, funded by Amgen, was presented Friday at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in Washington, DC.

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http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1615664?query=featured_home

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