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Cancer incidence and mortality among young adults aged 20-39 years worldwide in 2012

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Colleagues at the France-based International Agency for Research on Cancer conducted a study to characterize the global burden of cancer on patients aged 20–39 years. Using 2012 data, they identified 975,396 new cancer cases in this demographic that year—along with 358,392 related deaths.

Colleagues at the France-based International Agency for Research on Cancer conducted a study to characterize the global burden of cancer on patients aged 20–39 years. Using 2012 data, they identified 975,396 new cancer cases in this demographic that year—along with 358,392 related deaths. Women bore the brunt of the burden, with female breast cancer and cervical cancer topping the types of new cancer cases. Other leading culprits included thyroid cancer, leukemia, and colorectal cancer. Besides gender, geographical region and socioeconomic development also played a role in how the cancer burden was distributed. Geographically, for instance, infection-associated cancers were more prevalent in regions undergoing transition. Cancer incidence was higher, meanwhile, in places with very high levels of life expectancy, education, and incomes; however, mortality tied to cancer was three times higher in areas that ranked on the low end of socioeconomic spectrum. Finally, the population-based study indicated that the worldwide cancer profile for young adults is lower than that of older populations. Nonetheless, the researchers conclude, the significant societal and economic effects tied to premature morbidity and mortality warrant targeted surveillance, prevention, and treatment strategies for this largely underserved group.

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http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045(17)30677-0/fulltext

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